Faith in Politically Dark Places

faith_in_dark_places_FC.jpgAs British society is gradually torn apart by Government cuts and the gap between rich and poor gets ever wider, there’s a feeling that a better world must be possible.

For many of us a Labour government with a healthy majority would be a very good start, but it’s not at all clear who will win the next General Election.

UKIP has thrown a spanner in the works but, even without the Kippers, the Right has a strong support base among traditional churchgoers: many of whom not only agree with the Coalition austerity program but say the cuts should go even deeper.

It’s against this grim political backdrop that a new and greatly extended edition of Faith in Dark Places tinyurl.com/k2fw87g (SPCK) has hit the streets.

Combining moving stories of people living in poverty with a fresh approach to the Gospel, the book explores the revolutionary idea that the good news of God’s love is being spoken to a divided world by the most unlikely of people: the poor.

The miracles of Jesus are revealed to be highly subversive acts with huge social and economic implications; the story of the prodigal son shows us something remarkable about marginalised women; and the Lord’s Prayer suddenly snaps into focus as a highly political prayer for the poor.

It is often said that Jesus lived in another age and another culture and that we cannot simply transpose his words into our 21st century world. But in many respects Jesus lived in a situation very similar to our own: a world of widespread poverty, oppression and injustice. And of government propaganda.

Which is why the book argues that the reason Jesus was crucified was because he hated paint: the way the poor and vulnerable are demonised and ‘painted’ as worthless by the rich and powerful. Ian Duncan Smith please note.

We on the left are often accused of politicising the Gospel. But the fact is that, from beginning to end, the Gospel is profoundly political. Jesus died a political death for political reasons, for causing political problems.

Attempts by the institutional Church to neutralise the potency and impact of the Gospel have been remarkably successful. The cross and the call to discipleship have been so ‘spiritualised’ that Christianity has become synonymous with the status quo. Jesus was raised from the dead, but we have succeeded in burying him again. It’s been a public relations triumph for the vested interests of the powerful.

Why read this book? Because it makes accessible crucially important new thinking (or maybe very old thinking) on the Gospel and the Incarnation. It honours those who are dishonoured every day in the right wing press and in Parliament. And it challenges the knee-jerk voting habits of church-going Tories in the run up to the most important General Election since 1945.

Faith in Dark Places (£9.95) is written by David Rhodes, a member of Christians on the Left. He blogs at www.turbulentbooks.co.uk and tweets @RhodesWriter 

Post topics:
Do you like this post?

Showing 2 reactions


commented 2014-11-20 12:06:25 +0000 · Flag
Thanks for your very encouraging comment Martin. Your solidarity is much appreciated. I’m still writing: a new book, Finding Mr Goldman, is out in February. A parable about the journey of redemption of an evil capitalist. Poverty, greed and third world issues. Gordon Gekko meets John Bunyan!
David
commented 2014-11-16 13:29:31 +0000 · Flag
Wow, amazing comment and exceptionally accurate in espousing how deeply radical the Gospels are. If the book is as radical as your comment then it needs to be read by all Christians. Never again will people be able to say that politics needs to be separated from the Gospels. I love the sentence….‘jesus has been raised but we have buried him again’ in a soil of over spiritualised dogma and blinkered ignorance to what the Gospels are about. Please keep writing articles.





Related posts on Faith


This week Pastor Bill Johnson, leader of the influential Bethel Church in California, published this post, in which he explained his justifications for voting for Donald Trump. Martin Holst, a member of the Christians on the Left executive, gives his thoughts in response.


Many people are surprised – and more than a little concerned - at the choice of Donald Trump for President by the American electorate. To them he seems a mystifying choice, totally unsuited in both temperament and character, for the immense responsibilities of this office. It may sound like hyperbole, but the prayer on the lips of many was ‘Lord, have mercy’ followed by a heart cry: why, oh why, when there is so much uncertainty, friction and trouble around the world, has the Lord allowed such a man to be elected President?


More topics: